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Full text of "Victory Farm Volunteers of the U.S. Crop Corps"

E3 



DRE N LIBRA 



^ W OF THE U.S. 

THIS BOOK MUST N0T C ROP CORPS 



EED 500,000 
BOYS AND GIRLS 



AWI- 52 



JULY 1943 



WHY THE FARMER NEEDS YOUR HELP 



The Farmer has one of the Nation's most 
important jobs. Uncle Sam has called on him 




to raise food for our fighting men, our war 
workers, and our allies. His sons and hired 
men may be in the armed forces or working 
in war plants. More food than ever must be 
produced with fewer people to do it. Every- 
body who can must help! 



HOW BOYS AND GIRLS CAN GET WORK 
ON A FARM THIS SUMMER 

Be a Victory Farm Volunteer. This is the 
title given boys and girls volunteering for work 
on farms this summer. The volunteers are 
part of the U. S. Crop Corps. The best 
estimate is that half a million boys and girls 
will be needed. 

In many high schools the Victory Farm 
Volunteers may be a part of the High School 
Victory Corps. Private and parochial schools 
may also organize a VFV group. A teacher in 
the school will be in charge of Victory Farm 
Volunteer recruitment. County agricultural 



agents with the help of local volunteer com- 
mittees will arrange for the placement and 
supervision of the boys and girls on farms. 

COOPERATION OF YOUTH-SERVING 
AGENCIES 

Youth -serving agencies are participating 
wholeheartedly in the Victory Farm Volunteer 
program. In many sections of the country 
they are running farm work camps and other 
VFV programs. Boys and girls can apply 
through local club leaders and youth-serving 
agencies, or the Junior Citizen Service Corps 
of the Civilian Defense Councils. Such groups 
will be considered full members of the VFV 
and will, of course, be eligible for the insignia 
and certificate of service. 

WHO CAN JOIN THE VICTORY FARM 
VOLUNTEERS 

Any able-bodied boy or girl who is 14 years 
of age or older and willing to help with farm 
work can join. The greatest demand will be 
for boys who are 16 and 17 years old and girls 
who are 16 years old or older. 

Members of the Victory Farm Volunteers 
will not wear uniforms. Insignia, as shown 
on the back of this folder, will be available. 



Certificates of service will be issued at the end 
of the season to recruits who make good. 

TRAINING 

Many volunteers will receive some training 
through the schools. The training will vary 
in each county and school and may include 
scheduled instruction periods during school 
hours, Saturday training in organized groups, 
talks by agricultural agents and leading farmers, 
and week-end visits to farms. In addition, 
volunteers will be given some physical condi- 
tioning in school and taught how to keep in 
good condition for their work. Most of the 
training in farm skills will be done on the job 
by the farmer, but every effort will be made 
to give certain skill training before the young 
people are employed. 

KINDS OF FARM SERVICE 

There are three types of placement. 

1. Living with the farmer's family, doing 
general farm work, such as harvesting and 
threshing grain, making hay, and caring for 
livestock. Young people volunteering for this 
type of placement will be expected to sign up 
for 2 to 4 months. 

2. Living at home, being transported daily 
to and from the farm, for special jobs. Young 
people working on this basis will sign up for 
varying lengths of time. 

3. Living in a supervised camp, helping to 
harvest vegetables, fruits, and other crops. 
Work camps will generally run from 1 to 2 
months. 

The type of farming, the labor needs, and 
other factors will determine where the Victory 
Farm Volunteers will be placed. 

SUPERVISION 

Supervision will be provided for the mutual 
protection of all concerned. Farms, as well as 
the recruits assigned to these farms, will be 



carefully selected. Those who live on farms 
will be visited regularly by the emergency farm 
labor assistant (VFV). He will help the boy 
or girl to become acquainted in the community 
and take part in its activities. 4-H Clubs, 
Future Farmers' chapters, Defense Councils, 
and other community organizations will do all 
they can to make the Victory Farm Volunteers 
welcome. 



WAGES 

The farmer for whom they work will pay the 
Victory Farm Volunteers the same wages as 
those paid to other workers in the community 
doing the same kind and amount of work. 

Expenses will be paid by the volunteers out 
of what they earn, except when the farmer 
agrees to pay transportation and furnish room 
and board as part of the pay. In camps, 
young people will usually be charged a specified 
weekly rate for their living expenses at the 
camp. 

FARMERS' INTEREST IN THE VICTORY 
FARM VOLUNTEERS 

Farmers who employ these volunteers will 
not expect them to be seasoned, skilled farm 
workers from the start. The Extension Service 
will encourage farmers to start the volunteers 
on the simpler jobs first, until their muscles are 
hardened to do more difficult tasks. 

Farms will be selected according to standards 
set up by local farm placement committees, 
generally in accordance with Guides to Success- 
ful Employment of Nonfarm Youth in Wartime 
Agriculture, published by the Children's Bureau 
of the United States Department of Labor. 

INSURANCE 

Victory Farm Volunteers and their super- 
visors can get a special accident policy at a 
much reduced rate from a number of insurance 
companies. The policy will insure the workers 



for 3 months and will pay up to $250 for any 
medical expenses incurred in connection with 
an accident. It provides $500 for loss of life, 
and up to $1,000 for loss of limb or of sight. 
It will cover the worker 24 hours a day wherever 
he may be, and will remain in effect for the 
full 3 months, even though the worker does not 
remain in farm work for the whole period. 
The policy costs $4. It can be renewed for an 
additional 3 months for $4, or for an additional 
month for $1.50. Application forms can be 
obtained from the county agricultural agent's 
office. 

ADVANTAGES OF FARM WORK 

Farm work is war work. Producing food is 
the most vital war job young people can do. 
It is just as important as tanks and guns in 
winning the war. 

Farm work makes for physical fitness. It 
provides the satisfactions of the out-of-doors. 
Experience in the country will broaden your 
outlook and give you a better understanding 
of the farmer's part in our life. 

For further information see your local school officials, 
the county agricultural agent. State Department of 
Education, or Extension Service of the State agricul- 
tural college. 

EXTENSION SERVICE 
United Stales Department of Agriculture 

In Collaboration With United Slates Office of Education 
and other Government and private agencies